• SEE YOU IN SEPTEMBER – at our Thurs. Sept. 21st meeting!

    September is also when postcard shows resume – in Merrickville (Sept. 9th) and Dundas (Sept 24th).

    Details on our show calendar page.

Contact

Contact usTPC Show banner at one of the following Email addresses:
info at torontopostcardclub.com
president at torontopostcardclub.com
membership at torontopostcardclub.com
editor at torontopostcardclub.com
tpcannualshow at torontopostcardclub.com
webmaster at torontopostcardclub.com

THE TORONTO POSTCARD CLUB
Fairview Mall Postal Outlet,
1800 Sheppard Ave. East,
P.O. Box 55238,
North York, ON M2J 5B9

4 Comments

  1. My relative is a collector of old Brandon Manitoba post cards and has written many articles on Brandon’s history.I am interested in knowing of any cards and what cards there are- can you Help? Thank you so much!

  2. I am a view Pioneer post card and folder collector. 1) Does anyone have any info or images of a Wirths Folder (1898) made of a Canadian City? Wirths Folders were made in the USA (1898-1903) and a 1956 book says that some Canadian examples exist.
    2) any info on which Canadian (Toronto?)printer printed the Epworth or Victorian Expo Postcards of 1897? Thanks

  3. Hello,

    My late father … was born in Toronto in 1917. Among his papers is a postcard, made in Canada, where the picture is a black and white photo of a young boy, about 4 years old. He certainly resembles my father as a boy, but nothing is printed on the postcard that it is my father. Was it a practice in those days to have a postcard made of one’s children? Or perhaps my grandparents were struck by the picture’s likeness to their little son. Is there a website where I could search postcards of children? Can you help? Thank you.

    • Hi Lorraine. Thanks for the question. It was indeed a common practice to have postcards made in this way. Most photography studios offered postcard prints and there would also be itinerant photographers who would produce “real photo” portrait postcards at fairs or at the beach or anywhere that people congregated. Countless millions of postcards of this type would have been produced worldwide between 1900 and about 1930, after which time the practice became rarer as people increasingly tended to take their own family photos rather than rely on professional photographers. If the image on the postcard looks like your father as a boy, it very probably is just that.

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